marcel barang

June 1932

In English, Reading matters on 18/03/2010 at 3:05 pm

 

‘But on matters like these who knows what people think? People like you and I don’t, but who is to know? Whether they’ll succeed or not is a different story. Thinking about it, I’m not happy. I don’t know what they are up to. If they succeed, I wonder what it will be like. But if they don’t I won’t feel happy either.’

…Everyone in the capital seemed to be on their guard and did not venture outside. Bangkok was holding its breath, waiting for the next development, but no-one dared to risk a prediction or venture a guess as to the likely turn of events.

…On the second day, Phloi started to hear rumours, and they were all bad, all thoroughly disquieting: the King was going to send in provincial forces to quell the revolt, and fierce battles and bloodshed were only to be expected; the rebels were going to put all the Royals in a boat and sink it in the ocean; all properties belonging to aristocrats and other rich people were to be confiscated – all rumours seemingly designed for the sole purpose of instilling fear in the hearts of listeners.

From ‘Book 3: Third Reign’ of Four Reigns, by Kukrit Pramoj, 1954

As I go through an almost final polishing of the translation of this very book, I can hear, carried across the river by the wind, the buzz of red anger from Sanam Luang and Ratchadamnern. Plus ça change…

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